Some time ago I saw a broadcast from Radar in which Michael Moss is talking about resources in the food industry. As a result of this broadcast, I have read his book ‘Salt, Sugar, Fat’. In this blog, I list some interesting facts from his book. The facts mentioned in the investigations have deepened my view of the food industry.

The basis for obesity has been laid

His book is a report of years of research in the food industry. He discusses what food producers do to make tempting products. For them profitable, but for the consumer, it leads to (unhealthy) weight gain. The products usually contain (too) much salt, sugar, and fat. These three ingredients reinforce each other and give the food their taste, mouthfeel, and crunchiness. Unfortunately, they also lead to obesity.

A number of noteworthy facts

Sugar

  • A child naturally has a preference for sweet and the food industry can respond to this.
  • The bliss point was conceived by Howard Moskowitz and means the concentration at which the sensory pleasure is optimal.
  • Our body has more difficulty recognizing calories in liquids than solid foods, so you can easily get soft drinks.

Fat

  • There is no bliss point for fat and it is made even more delicious by adding sugar, thereby reinforcing each other’s attractiveness.
  • Fat makes products tastier, is a flavor maker and it is therefore very difficult to make products that contain less fat and sell well. For example, cheese without fat cannot be eaten.
  • Cheese is not immediately recognized as fatty food, while it contains a lot of saturated fat. The saturated fat does not stand out because it binds to the protein molecules.

salt

  • We don’t like salt naturally. Because of the small amounts that we receive as a baby, we slowly get used to it. Once we love salt, it has a huge and lasting impact on our eating habits. It is therefore important that you start early and limit the influence.
  • The recommended amount of salt in America is 2300 milligrams and with processed food products you go far beyond it every day.
  • The salt cellar does not cause the large salt intake, but the salt in processed food causes that high amount.

Back to basic

The food industry is logically focused on making a profit. On the other hand, humanity is increasingly suffering from obesity due to the amounts of salt, sugar and fat in products. However, reducing these quantities leads to a lower turnover for producers. So you can expect that this will not happen soon. Until that moment, the only solution is to adopt a healthy lifestyle yourself and opt for unprocessed products, because you will not find healthy food in the paths of processed food.

So back to basics. Ultimately you are the consumer and you make the choice what you buy and how much you eat.

Everyone knows that feeling of nausea and wants to get rid of it as quickly as possible. There are many home remedies and one of the best known is cola. But cola against nausea, does that really help?

Coke against nausea

If you look on the internet, you will often read that cola helps as a natural remedy when you are nauseous. Cola is also recommended for vomiting, to remedy the effects of nausea due to alcohol and many other things. Why does cola help against nausea? Is cola good for the stomach? That information is usually not mentioned. It should calm the stomach and therefore work so well with all kinds of physical discomfort. It is also striking that the advice to use cola as a home remedy is often contradictory as to how this can best be done. Where one opinion says that cola should be used without a puncture and at room temperature, another speaks of ice cold cola with puncture for the same ailment. The way you should drink it is also regularly recommended differently.

The scientific proof

There is no scientific evidence that cola helps against nausea and it has not been proven during investigations. And although the formula for the real cola is of course a secret, there are no ingredients in cola that have an effect that could calm the stomach. Nevertheless, very similar advice from grandma’s time is usually based on observations over a long period. For example, cola can be used to treat stomach pain so that it can indeed help dissolve stomach stones. It certainly does not matter whether the cola is without a shot and also the temperature and the way you drink it does not matter. The ingredients in the cola just do the job when they end up in the stomach.

Then why does cola help against nausea?

Perhaps you have tried it yourself as a natural remedy because you wanted to get rid of that nasty nausea as quickly as possible or to remedy nausea caused by alcohol. The experts then think that the psychological aspect will play a role. If you are sufficiently convinced of how it works, such a product can certainly help.

Which remedies really soothe the stomach?

Although little is known about how nausea occurs and why the body reacts in this way, it is known that ‘soothing’ the stomach helps to combat the effects of nausea. Ginger is a medicine that has been scientifically determined to calm the stomach. So if you are nauseous, it is better to try a cup of ginger tea than a glass of coke with or without a shot.

If you have become drunk and want to prevent the nausea from alcohol as much as possible, it is a good idea to eat some dry bread. The bread does not disturb the stomach, but the alcohol will be broken down sooner if your digestive system is started.

Browsing through the ready-made weekly menu and the ready-made accompanying shopping list (thinking for yourself is out of the question) I already have slight doubts. First, there is the practical feasibility. How do you combine this with the rest of your family? How do you do that with your groceries if your list contains 50 grams of peeled shrimp, 6 sun-dried tomatoes and so on? Secondly, and certainly not less important: what about the provision of vitamins, minerals and other nutrients?

Crash Diets and the Daily Recommended Quantity

I want to prove hard. I want to know if such diets meet the nutrient and quantity standards. So I make a quick calculation to see if this ‘diet’ is sufficient. I choose a random daily menu: day 3 of week 2. I come to the following conclusion: a total of 1160 kcal. 22 grams of dietary fiber – about half of what a person needs in a day. Further shortages of: calcium, magnesium, iron, selenium, zinc, vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin E, folic acid, vitamin B12, vitamin B1, vitamin B2. In short, just about the only vitamin that is sufficient in the diet is vitamin C.

In itself it is not bad to get too little of a vitamin one day; broadly it must be balanced over a longer period. But a diet of less than 1200 kcal daily? It is simply not possible to get enough nutrients. Also not enough energy by the way: 1200 kcal is about half of what an average person needs in a day.

Practical feasibility of crash diets

And there comes the issue of practical feasibility. There is a pack of chocolate flakes in the cupboard that you needed for 1 slice of bread on day 1. The same goes for a broken pack of vanilla custard and a can of whipped cream. The sum seems to me relatively simple. Because what happens if you sit on the couch at 10 o’clock in the evening creating the hunger after your grilled 100-gram steak with a little bit of vegetables? A perfect moment to make up the ‘leftovers’ because it is a shame to throw it away.

Conclusion

Such crash diets do not work. To lose weight you will have to make consistent changes to your purchases, eating habits and exercise patterns. But this is simply not possible in 8 weeks; This takes time. You prefer to change your lifestyle under expert guidance, and you do that mainly because you want to. And then the kilos may not fly off, no. But the moment you want to get back into your bikini, you are that number of kilos lighter than you would otherwise have arrived long and wide after your 8 week AD project.